My Promise To You

Austin’s Stay at Home Ordinance – How It Effects You As A Caregiver 

As of Wednesday, March 25, if you are currently caring for a family you are deemed an Essential Employee and are exempt from the travel restrictions placed upon most Austinites during this time. A few caregivers have reached out concerned what to do if they are stopped by law enforcement inquiring why they are commuting or out in public. We’ve been told that if you inform them you are a caregiver on your way to care for your client they will waive you on your way.

However, if you are worried about being stopped and questioned you may download the form below and have it signed by your employer (the family you work for). It clearly states that you are an Essential Employee of the family providing healthcare for them. Please feel free to print this file and have your employer sign it for you.

Lawrence Maze

Founder of CareSearch

Important COVID-19 Information

Taken from www.austintx.org

Recommendations for Essential Employees 

Refrain from reporting to work when falling within any of the following criteria and follow the initial self-quarantine recommendations 

  • If you have signs or symptoms of a respiratory infection, such as a cough, shortness of breath, or sore throat; 
  • Have a fever greater than 99.6°F; 
  • In the previous 14 days has had contact with someone with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 and did not have the appropriate personal protective equipment designated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); is under investigation for COVID-19; or is ill with a respiratory illness; 
  • Traveled to an area the World Health Organization or CDC considers a “Hotspot.”

Taken from www.alz.org

Tips for Dementia Caregivers at Home

Caregivers of individuals living with Alzheimer’s and all other dementia should follow guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and consider the following tips:

  • For people living with dementia, increased confusion is often the first symptom of any illness. If a person living with dementia shows rapidly increased confusion, contact your health care provider for advice. Unless the person is having difficulty breathing or a very high fever, it is recommended that you call your health care provider instead of going directly to an emergency room. Your doctor may be able to treat the person without a visit to the hospital. 
  • People living with dementia may need extra and/or written reminders and support to remember important hygienic practices from one day to the next.
    • Consider placing signs in the bathroom and elsewhere to remind people with dementia to wash their hands with soap for 20 seconds. 
    • Demonstrate thorough hand-washing. 
    • Alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol can be a quick alternative to hand-washing if the person with dementia cannot get to a sink or wash his/her hands easily.
  • Ask your pharmacist or doctor about filling prescriptions for a greater number of days to reduce trips to the pharmacy. 
  • Think ahead and make alternative plans for the person with dementia should adult day care, respite, etc. be modified or cancelled in response to COVID-19.
  • Think ahead and make alternative plans for care management if the primary caregiver should become sick.

Tips for Caregivers of Individuals in Assisted Living

The CDC has provided guidance to facilities on infection control and prevention of COVID-19 in nursing homes. This guidance is for the health and safety of residents. Precautions may vary based on local situations. 

  • Check with the facility regarding their procedures for managing COVID-19 risk. Ensure they have your emergency contact information and the information of another family member or friend as a backup.
  • Do not visit your family member if you have any signs or symptoms of illness. 
  • Depending on the situation in your local area, facilities may limit or not allow visitors. This is to protect the residents but it can be difficult if you are unable to see your family member. 
  • If visitation is not allowed, ask the facility how you can have contact with your family member. Options include telephone calls, video chats or even emails to check in. 
  • If your family member is unable to engage in calls or video chats, ask the facility how you can keep in touch with facility staff in order to get updates.

Staying Healthy

Pay attention to flu or pneumonia-like symptoms in yourself and others and report them to a medical professional immediately.

Follow current guidance and instruction from the CDC regarding COVID-19. Tips to keep yourself and your loved ones healthy include:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick; work from home.
  • If you or the person you are caring for have regular doctor’s appointments to manage dementia or other health conditions, call your health care provider to inquire about a telehealth appointment. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Medicare has recently expanded telehealth benefits to allow seniors to access health care from the safety of their homes. 
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. 
    • Always wash hands with soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.